Wire Cut Machine Manufacturer

Wire Cut Machine Manufacturer

EXCETEK’s wire cut EDM is one of the most popular EDM machines ever produced in Taiwan due to their competitive features. EXCETEK insists in the quality policy that offers only the best Wire Cut machines as well as related accessories. There are major four series that can meet most of the EDM processing demands. Wire Cut NP Series Comply with TUV CE comformity, both safety and desired design with easy operation. Power slider door design to save installation space and light operation. This Wire Cut machine also take advantages of the technology:

1. High Precision: Smart Conrner Control、Stable Discharge Module、SFC Super Finish Circuit.

2. Efficiency: DPM module、Entrance mark control、EF Electrolysis Free generator system

3. Cost Saving: Intellignet Power Management、Save Wire Consumption、Low running cost.

4. Intelligent Networking: Remote monitor and management、Connect all Controller、Portable device monitor.

5. Automation: High speed Auto Wire Threading、Workpiece Transfer Robot、Auto Measurement and Correction.

YC Inox Stainless Steel Pipe

YC Inox Stainless Steel Pipe

Stainless Steel Pipe

YC Inox acquires ISO 9001, ISO 17025 lab 14001, OHSAS 18001 occupation safety & hygiene, and TOSHMS certificate. Moreover, our Stainless Steel Pipe are approved by CNS Mark, JIS Mark, CE Mark, and many ship building associations such as DNV (Norway), RINA (Italy), BV (France), GL (Germany), and LR (UK), and as well as the EU pressure container PED/AD2000 certificate and NSF/ANSI 61 drinking water certificate.

Geology: We know T. rex was fierce, but how strong was its bite?

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This is a great time to be a paleontologist, especially one studying dinosaurs. Not only are new species being discovered on an almost weekly basis, but more sophisticated imaging methods are allowing us to extract more information from those fossils, whether they were collected recently or a hundred years ago.Also, computer modeling of the biomechanics of dinosaurs allows us to deduce more about how those wonderful beasts worked as living animals.Tyrannosaurus rex, the […]

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As artificial materials wear out, scientists scramble to save museum pieces

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LOS ANGELES — The custodians of Neil Armstrong’s spacesuit at the National Air and Space Museum saw it coming. A marvel of human engineering, the suit is made of 21 layers of various plastics: nylon, neoprene, Mylar, Dacron, Kapton and Teflon.The rubbery neoprene layer would pose the biggest problem. The suit’s caretakers knew the neoprene, although invisible, buried deep between the other layers, would harden and become brittle with age, eventually making the […]

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Going to the moon? Remember your skates

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There is almost certainly ice water on the surface of the moon, hiding in the cold, dark places near the north and south poles, a new study shows.Scientists already had thought there was water up there, but it appears that this ice — very muddy ice, mixed with a lot of lunar dust — exists inside craters where direct sunlight does not reach it.The authors of the study say the findings are exciting because they call for further exploration. The ice could even […]

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FirstEnergy Solutions to close four power plants, three in Ohio

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Akron-based FirstEnergy Solutions said Wednesday that it plans to shut down four power plants, three that are in Ohio, in 2021 and ’22.The company, a subsidiary of power company FirstEnergy, said it plans to close coal-fired plants in Eastlake near Cleveland, an oil-fired unit in Stratton in northeast Ohio and a coal-fired unit in Shippingport, Pennsylvania, on June 1, 2021. A coal-fired unit at Stratton will be shut down on June 1, 2022.The closings are the latest in a wave of […]

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Ohio utility regulators prepare for coming changes in use of electricity

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The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio lays out a “roadmap” on how to manage future energy uses such as electric vehicles or home batteries.

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Legoland Discovery Center puts finishing touches on first Ohio location at Easton Town Center

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The smell of sawdust is still in the air, but a sense of excitement is, too, inside the new Legoland Discovery Center at Easton Town Center.When it opens next month, the $10 million educational play center will be the first of its kind in Ohio, the 11th in North America and 22nd worldwide.”It is the second largest in the U.S.,” said Jacob Kristensen, general manager of the play center and self-described Lego nerd. “Phoenix is largest — but we’ll be better!”Located […]

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Big Table conversation topics range far and wide in Columbus Wednesday

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The Big Table held more than 750 conversations in Columbus, ranging from electric vehicles to immigration

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Tree trimmer fatally electrocuted on the Far East Side

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A tree trimmer is dead after he was electrocuted while working on the Far East Side Tuesday afternoon, a Columbus Division of Fire spokeswoman said.The electrocution was reported shortly after 1:30 p.m. on the 6000 block of Forestview Drive.A branch of the tree that the worker was trimming came in contact with an electrical wire, causing the fatal shock, Columbus Division of Fire spokeswoman Rebecca Diehm said.Firefighters are on the scene and AEP Ohio is shutting down […]

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Trump’s tariffs on Canadian newsprint are overturned

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WASHINGTON — The International Trade Commission on Wednesday overturned a Trump administration decision to impose tariffs on Canadian newsprint, saying that American paper producers are not harmed by newsprint imports.The unanimous decision by the five-member body is a win for small- and medium-sized newspapers, which have struggled to absorb the cost of higher newsprint and engaged in cost-cutting, including layoffs and reduced pages, as a result.The Commerce […]

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Retailer Express beats sales, profit predictions for second quarter

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Columbus-based specialty fashion retailer Express beat Wall Street expectations in sales and earnings for the second quarter.“Our second quarter performance represents another step forward in our pursuit of returning Express to sustainable and profitable long-term growth,” said David Kornberg, Express president and CEO, in a statement.Express reported sales during the quarter of $493.6 million, up from from $481.2 million in the same quarter last year, and beating […]

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